Havana café, of infras and revolutionaries. Teaser

Synopsis

There are places that become mythical; they are part of urban archaeology and no one knows if it is true what is said about them or whether the stories of the place really happened.

Without a doubt, the Café Havana is one of them, if what interests us is the history of the mid-twentieth century of Mexico City.

Located just one block from the Ministry of the Interior, it was the closest thing to the political police, snitches and spies.

Its closeness to the newsrooms of the main newspapers of the time was another reason to observe from its tables.

If Mexico City were certainly a centre of international espionage throughout the twentieth century, then this place was and still is a comfortable place to observe.

Journalists and writers, some of the stature of León Felipe, Octavio Paz, Pepe de la Colina, Julio Scherer, Manuel Buendía were regulars of Café La Habana in their time. System opponents also came here. Many tales were written here, and many have been invented about this place.

It is said that the infrarealists, so reviled at the time, came here headed by Roberto Bolaño.

It is said that Fidel Castro and Ernesto “Che” Guevara were secretly sneaking out for an espresso. Who knows for sure? “Havana Café, of infras and revolutionaries.”